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Painting Portraits from Photographs: Week 3 Charcoal and Pastel

March 10, 2021

The White Fascinator
Charcoal and Pastel

This week’s portrait challenge is to paint someone wearing a hat or headdress. All the illustrations for this have been made in pastel or by making a tonal under drawing in charcoal, fixing it really well then adding layers of colour.

For an adult face quite dense layers of charcoal may be laid down to describe the forms of the face and mass of hair. For a child’s face a more delicate approach may be needed and it would be better to start with a drawing in pastel or pastel pencil using similar colours to those that will be used to finish the work.

Some examples of portrait paintings where the model is wearing a hat, hood or other and fascinators definitely come into the class of other! can be found on the Pinterest board that can be accessed by the link below:

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/jhall1282/portraits/hats-on/

Eva in Tuscany
Pastel on Khadi paper
Charlotte
Charcoal and white pastel pencil
This is on Murano paper which is slightly darker and greener than this scan. Charcoal and white pastel pencil was used and the mass of hair indicated by a dense well rubbed in layer of charcoal. A heavy application of fixative was made which both sealed the charcoal and restored the tooth of the paper for subsequent pastel layers.

When making a tonal study it is essential that the drawing is accurate. If the photograph is a front view or slightly three quarter view try to observe the following. Not quite so possible if the model is wearing a wide brimmed hat or in profile!

Look at the general shape of the head. Note whether it is tilted sideways and how this affects the axis of symmetry. Perhaps drop a vertical down so that it crosses the head between the eyes. Then drop a line from the highest point of the head to the tip of the chin, you will be then be able to see how much the head is tilted and you will be able to either make the eyes level if the head is perfectly straight, or at the correct slant if not.

Although if someone is looking straight at you the middle of the eyes appear about half way between the tip of the chin and the top of the skull, this alters when the head is tilted upwards or downwards. When looking up there will be considerable foreshortening so the eyes will appear nearer the top of the head but the ears will appear lower and you will be able to see under the chin and up the nostrils.

When the head is looking down with the chin tucked in, obviously you will see more of the top of the head and all the facial features will be rather differently foreshortened. The eyes will appear lower, the ears higher and the nose may overhang the mouth. The lower lip may disappear and only a little of the chin may be visible.

Usually a photographic reference will not be as extreme as this but do note the position of the head in relation to the head and shoulders.

Also note the width of the head in relation to it’s height and the position of the ears in relation to the point where the lower jaw articulates with the rest of the skull. It’s a good idea to feel this on your own head and also to examine the rather fundamental fact that a head, although roughly rounded has a curved frontal plane and curved sides. It is possible to think of the sides starting where the temples and cheek bones make a rounded corner. Again feel your own head and it will be easier to think about the structure of the head when you are drawing.

Charlotte
First applications of colour; pastel pencil and soft pastel. This was started by very lightly scribbling or hatching pastel pencil of different browns reds and purple greys over the face and then using softer pastel quite lightly to establish the first areas of colour.
Charlotte
Further layers of pastel and beginning to paint the background.
Mainly soft pastel sticks were used adding more colour and tone to the face and also to the hair and background which will be kept fairly simple and darker on the left. There are a couple of things not quite right with the drawing which I hope to correct for the finished portrait. Next week you can tell me what they are.
Charlotte
Think it’s finished now but I’ll leave it around for a while!
May ad to the background and work on the lower neck and collar bones.

Leaving you with a final thought; remember that the hair is on the head so be generous with it! And if the model has very little hair you have the perfect chance to get the head shape spot on!

Your paintings;

Pastel by Maricarmen
Charcoal by Barbara
Happiness in a Hat
Acrylic by Malcolm
Ian Wright
Charcoal by Elizabeth
Felix
Pastel by Elizabeth
Pastel by John
Archie
Acrylic by Heather
Amy and that Ascot Hat
Pastel by Liz
Jayden
Pastel by Liz
Acrylic by Pam
Prince Charles
Pastel by Shane
My Sister
Pastel by Sarah
Pastel by Maryon
Chris
Charcoal under drawing by Heather
Chris
Acrylic by Heather

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