Menu

The Power of Colour 2: Blue and Orange

January 12, 2021

Alien: Gouache and Watercolour

Orange and Blue is a very versatile colour combination producing vivid contrasts and yet in mixes some lovely muted colours and greys can be made. In theory you should be able to mix a neutral grey if the orange and blue are mixed in the right proportions. Try this with an ultramarine and a cadmium orange. The exercise below used gouache pigments but could be done with watercolour or acrylic.

Somewhere in the middle is a neutral grey but so dark it is difficult to distinguish the colour.

Try adding a titanium white to one of the darkest mixes. That will soon reveal whether the mix has a blue or an orange bias. See below.

In this case the dark mix selected clearly had a blue bias.

Last week we saw how different hues looked when the same hue was surrounded by hues that were different in tone and saturation. This week we are throwing a much greater colour difference into the mix and the effects of pale and dark borders. The following were constructed digitally but the same principles apply when you are painting.

All the blue circles here and in the illustration below are the same in hue and tone. There are no outlines to any of the above circles but you may see the illusion of one in three of the circles. The blue on black appears to glow and the circle on white appears smaller.
When black was added to the green so that it was a little darker in tone than the blue the blue began to glow/float in the square, just as it does on the black square. Again there is an illusion of the outer edges of the circles appearing darker except on the black square.

Outlines matter: the arrangement of colour is identical in the three illustrations below, they differ only in that the first group have no outline, the second group a black outline and the third group a white otline to the cross shapes.

No outline: top row all blue is the same hue and tone
Lower row middle two blues are the same hue and tone
Think about how the difference in appearance of the top two left squares has been achieved.
Black outline;top row all blue is the same hue and tone
Lower row middle two blues are the same hue and tone
Generally the black outline prevents colour from appearing to spread. Think about why some of the black boundaries seem to disappear and why the colours of stained glass appear so rich.
White outline;top row all blue is the same hue and tone
Lower row middle two blues are the same hue and tone
Think about why a white outline can almost always be noticed.

References for this week can be found on the Power of Colour Pinterest board at:

https://www.pinterest.co.uk/jhall1282/the-power-of-colour/blue-and-orange/

The first challenge is to create two or three small studies that show how blue and orange can relate to each other, much as we did for the different blue hues. This time I would like to see both studies use similar shapes; these can be organic or more geometric. The colours should be distinct and either have no border, a black border or a white border. Use only one blue and a premixed orange e.g. cadmium orange or a similar bright orange.

Some people really enjoy making these studies/little abstract paintings. If you do, you may like to spend all your time on this. If not just spend a short time mixing colours; especially noticing any differences between mixing the complementary colours together, and mixing each complementary with white or black before spending most of your time on a painting; see notes below the study notes..

First Study; work with your chosen blue and orange as the brightest blocks of colour you can make. Include white as pure white and black as pure black and include shapes with and without outlines.

Second Study: In the second study try including some desaturated colour by mixing your blue with the orange. You may use white but not black.

(if time)Third Study: This time you may still use only one orange and one blue but do not mix them with each other, just use white or black to de-saturate the colours. You may choose whether to include any areas of pure blue and pure orange or you may choose to work with either very pale or very dark colour mixes.

Medium: You may use any medium for this; collage would work brilliantly perhaps inspired by works by Patrick Heron or Josef Albers. An opaque medium like gouache would also work well. This can also be done with watercolour, pastel or acrylic. These studies can be quite small and contain only about eight shapes, certainly not more than about twelve. If you decide to work in collage; paint some pieces of cartridge paper and cut or tare them to make your shapes. White paper can be your pure white and if you have any black paper that can be your black.

Painting; after the studies spend some time looking at the Pinterest Board again and make your own composition using any of your blue pigments, black and white but use only one premixed orange. Mix these however you like. An opaque orange like Cadmium Orange would be ideal but any bright orange will do.

Note how black lines can separate areas of colour, containing them as in a stained glass window. We often prepare to paint by drawing with lines that separate areas we may later choose to fill with colour. These lines usually represent edges of what we can see. Very often we obliterate these lines during the course of painting so that one colour lies directly against its neighbouring colour with no dividing line. See how in some works the artist uses line, sometimes to separate blocks of colour and/or to define the edges of objects within an area of colour as in the blue and gold interior painted by Matisse referenced on the Pinterest board for this week.

When looking at paintings look for works that use line and those that represent forms with no line which is much more as we see them.

Look at how Modigliani sometimes used a pale blue for eyes in a rather orange face. You might consider working from a black and white portrait photo. In landscape paintings blues tend to recede and the orange and red colours seem to advance. Whether you produce an abstract or a representational piece think about edges and enjoy the colour!

Your Paintings;

Collage by Maryon
Still Life after Mondrian
Pastel and Collage by Maryon
Flowers 1
Gouache by Maricarmen
Flowers 2
Gouache by Maricarmen
Studies in Blue and Orange by Heather
Seascape in Blue and Orange
Watercolour by Heather
Oranges by Heather
After Modigliani by Heather
After Modigliani by Ann
After Modigliani by Ann
After Matisse by Ann
Studies in Blue and Orange by Liz
Gouache and collage
Gnarled Trunk by Liz
Gouache and Ink
Tree at Pinkneys Green by Jan
Ultramarine and Orange watercolour with Titanium White
Liverpool by Jan
Ultramarine Blue and Orange watercolour
Orange added to last week’s Blue study
Watercolour by Barbara
Collage by Barbara
Orange Nude, inspired by Matisse
Acrylic by Barbara
Orange and Cerulean
Colour mixes with Blue and Orange by Shirley
Canyon
Watercolour by Shirley
Shirley added to last week’s study; watercolour and collage
After Matisse by John
Loggos at Night, Paxos
Watercolour by Sarah
Indigo, Ultramarine, Orange, Black, White
Oranges by Sarah: mixed media
Watercolour, India Ink, Pastel
Blue and Orange Fort, Temple, Palace?: Imagined
Watercolour by Sarah
Montagues and Capulets
or Floating Cerulean Rectangle
Just for once the reds lose out!
Acrylic by Malcolm

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *